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  1. Unit 1 - Introducing Regulation, Standards and Governance 28 items
    1. Resource 1 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 8 items
      1. The Handbook of Security - M. L. Gill 2014

        Book Essential Overview: Please read the chapter by Adams entitled ‘Security Ethics: Principled Decision Making in Hard Cases’. Considerations: This chapter provides a good overview of the study of ethics and its relationship to security management. The two case studies presented will enable you to begin to think through the best ways of applying principles to practice.

      2. Business ethics: managing corporate citizenship and sustainability in the age of globalization - Andrew Crane, Dirk Matten 2010

        Book Essential Overview: Read Chapter 3 entitled ‘Evaluating Business Ethics‘. This chapter covers the main theories important because it illustrates which theories belong to which condition; non-consequentialist and consequentialist. Considerations: Having read both chapters, spend some time thinking through the theoretical approaches then consider how you could answer the following question. Do you consider security and/or risk management as consequentialist or non-consequentialist; are they the same?

      3. Is Your Banker Leaking Your Personal Information? The Roles of Ethics and Individual-Level Cultural Characteristics in Predicting Organizational Computer Abuse - Paul Benjamin Lowry, Clay Posey, Tom L. Roberts, Rebecca J. Bennett 2014-5

        Article Essential Overview: Read this journal article which explores ethics in more detail and relates it to a specific business case concerning the privacy of clients’ information. This is a major concern for modern organisations and as you read consider the role of ethics in a policy you are familiar with. Considerations: Having read this article, thinking in the context of an organisation you are familiar with; consider some of the possible arguments you could make should a member of the organisation propose applying a cost benefit analysis to determine a solution to a complex ethical problem.

      4. BBC - Search results for bae systems fined

        Webpage Essential Overview: Read these articles and watch the short (2:16) BAE Systems Ethics video. Considerations: Having read the reports and BAE Systems’ power point and video, based on an organisation you know well, consider how business ethics thinking links with the practice of security and risk management. Are there any gaps?

      5. Our Ethics Programme - BAE Systems 2015

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview Watch the short (2:16) BAE Systems Ethics video Considerations Having read the reports and BAE Systems’ power point and video, based on an organisation you know well, consider how business ethics thinking links with the practice of security and risk management. Are there any gaps?

      6. Thomas Cook boss apologises over Corfu gas deaths - BBC News

        Webpage Essential Read these articles about Thomas Cook and think through what this indicates to ‘the travelling public’ about their approach to Business Ethics. Having read these reports list the key potential ethical dilemmas and implications from the perspective of security and risk managers. How might they be mitigated?

      7. Thomas Cook CEO refuses to say sorry for deaths as ex-boss declines questions | UK news | The Guardian

        Webpage Essential Overview Read these articles about Thomas Cook and think through what this indicates to ‘the travelling public’ about their approach to Business Ethics. Considerations Having read these reports list the key potential ethical dilemmas and implications from the perspective of security and risk managers. How might they be mitigated?

      8. Thomas Cook shares crash after Harriet Green is pushed out | Business | The Guardian

        Webpage Essential Read these articles about Thomas Cook and think through what this indicates to ‘the travelling public’ about their approach to Business Ethics. Having read these reports list the key potential ethical dilemmas and implications from the perspective of security and risk managers. How might they be mitigated?

    2. Resource 2 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 12 items
      1. ISO 9000 2015 Definitions in Plain English - praxiom

        Webpage Essential Overview Read through this summary of key terms associated with ISO standards. Consideration Having read the section above consider an organisation you know well. What evidence can you find of the use of this terminology in the organisations’ documents and/ or records? Can you identify areas where this language could be adopted to help to create a common language to help communication and decision-making?

      2. The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase its Profits, by Milton Friedman

        Webpage Essential Overview This article discusses the links between making profits and yet remaining socially responsible. Considerations As you read consider how you could argue that spending company funds on security is in the interests of shareholders.

      3. History of Quality - Qualityguru

        Webpage Essential Overview Read through this summary history of quality management. Considerations Having read through the contents of the Website, spend some time thinking about an organisation (ideally long-established) you know well. What evidence can you find of the development of quality standards, can you trace the links between the emergence of quality management and other related management practices? If you are new to the organisation, you may find it useful to speak to a long-serving member of staff.

      4. Red Bead Experiment with Dr. W. Edwards Deming 25/2/2014

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview Watch this short video w ith Dr Edwards Deming regarding how to assess quality management. The video also explores workers’ performance related to quality. Considerations Having watched the video, spend some time thinking through what occurred. Thinking about an organisation you know well, what evidence can you find of any of the specialist management processes designed to improved quality? Can you identify areas where management may be selecting staff based on quality management reasons? How could you advise managers on standardising staff selection on the basis of this video?

      5. Standards and guidelines, quick reference guide - ASIS International 2010

        Document Essential Overview This Quick Reference Guide describes how ASIS Standards and Guidelines are developed from a committee member and interested participant point of view Considerations Consider the differences in the processed involved in developing standards between three standards setting organisations

      6. Dr. Marc Siegel discusses international security standards and ISO 31000 Risk Management 2012

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview Watch this short video (5:23) in which Dr Marc Siegal discusses a range of security related standards, their purpose and the wider benefits from implementing standards. Considerations Having watched the video, and thinking about based on an organisation you know well, think of what opportunities could arise from implementing standards. Also think through potential barriers.

      7. ASIS/ANSI PAP. 1-2012, Security management standard: Physical asset protection

        Document  Overview This reading outlines what has been deemed important in physical asset protection; the standard has attracted attention from around the world. Considerations Read through the various sections in section B 1. General and think through which operations may be important related to an organisation you know well. What are the most important processes involved?

      8. Security management: strategic and operational guidelines - British Standards Institution 2015

        Book Essential Read the standard to examine in greater detail the guidance provided in the principles of good security. As you do so think about your organisation or an organisation you know well. Thinking of your organisation consider how far these these principles are already in place, Can you identify examples of good practice or any gaps. What recommendations or suggestions could you make regarding what you've discovered.

      9. ASIS/ANSI PAP. 1-2012, Security management standard: Physical asset protection

        Document Essential Overview: Read the section on the general principles and the benefits of using a management system approach to manage the physical asset in your organisation. Considerations: Having read this, what, if any, are the limitations associated with a management system approach? Have you used a management system approach in your professional life; was it a valuable tool or a source of contention? Do an internet search using the search term ‘management system approach’ and spend some time reviewing the examples that are returned.

      10. Security Management Standard: Physical Asset Protection - ASIS International

        Document Essential Overview Read section A8 for background on the management of performance Considerations: Having read this section, and thinking of an organisation you know well, think of how you would conduct a performance evaluation of a particular project and the main stakeholders involved. What main risks can you identify in performance evaluation of a particular project? Based on your assessment, what elements of the performance evaluation of a particular project could affect each of the identified stakeholders? How could you manage those potential impacts?

      11. Security Management Standard: Physical Asset Protection - ASIS International

        Document Essential Overview: Read section 5, which will give you more information on the role of leadership and governance and the management commitment. Considerations: Having read this section, and thinking of an organisation you know well, think through a potential future change project and the role of the top managements’ commitment. What main risks can you identify regarding top managements’ commitment? Based on your assessment, how could you manage those risks?

      12. Sharp rise in estimated costs of implementing new global insurance accounting standards | Deloitte UK - Deloitte

        Webpage  Overview This Press Release provides an insight into how one industry, in this case insurance, has encountered costs in implementing standards. Considerations As you read consider the benefits and costs arguments, they will help you assess the pros and cons of standards generally.

    3. Resource 3 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 8 items
      1. Simple, practical proposals for better reporting of corporate governance - Chartered Institute of Management Accountants

        Document Essential Overview: Read the CIMA report which gives an overview on corporate governance and how it can be translated from a set of principles to good practice. Considerations: Having read this section of the Unit and the report, ask yourself, have the core concepts of governance have changed and what this may mean for the study and practice of governance management?

      2. The Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance - A Cadbury

        Document Essential Overview Read this report which illustrates the key codes of practice to understand how effective it could be in helping implement better governance across an organisation. Considerations Having read this, spend some time thinking about an organisation with which you are familiar and how security managers are involved in governance. What kinds of evidence can you recognise of codes of good practice for good governance in practice? If there are gaps in practice, think through what barriers may exist?

      3. The SAGE handbook of governance - Mark Bevir 2011

        Book  Overview: Read Chapter 3 by Dowding entitled ‘Rational Choice Theory’. This chapter look at the Rational Choice Theory as a form of decision-making for Governance based on subjective decision and normative analysis. Considerations: Reflect on how this theory can be applied as a methodology, it will help if you conduct an internet search for examples of each approach.

      4. Interpreting global security - Mark Bevir 2013

        Book Essential Overview: Read this paper which addresses the main theories in security governance in more detail in how decision making can be made to help implement better governance. Considerations: Having read this paper, spend some time thinking about an organisation you know and their approaches to making decisions concerning governance. What examples of cooperation, free riders, dictators or pressure groups can you distinguish in the organisation’s decision making processes?

      5. The governance of policing and security: ironies, myths and paradoxes - Abraham Bob Hoogenboom 2010

        Book Essential Overview: Read Chapter 5 ‘The governance of police and security’. This chapter looks at the impact of different actors, especially non state ones in both helping to provide governance but also in undermining it. Considerations: Reflect on the relations between the different actors involved and any potential synergy, tension or points of conflict. You can access a pdf of the chapter in the Next Part.

      6. The SAGE handbook of governance - Mark Bevir 2011

        Book Essential Overview: Read the chapter by Norris entitled 'Measuring Governance' which sets out some of the key methods used. Considerations: Having read this chapter, spend some time thinking about an organisation with which you are familiar. What kinds governance can you identify that may have occurred in the past with this organisation? Think through the types of controls that are in place to prevent this type of failures in the future, can you see any gaps?

      7. Hyde company fined over worker's 40ft death plunge - BBC News

        Webpage Essential Overview: Read this article which sets out some of the issues associated with corporate governance. Considerations: Imagine a scenario similar to the accident discussed in the BBC article in organisation which you are familiar. Then, in the context of your chosen organisation, identify what you consider to be the most important governance issues related to each of Smith and Brooks’ (2013) ten risk clusters together with the measures for governance in the previous resource (Norris P., (2011) Measuring governance, in Belvir, M., (ed.), The Sage handbook of Governance. London, Sage, (Chapter 12, pp, 179-200) across a variety of different impact levels and timescales.

      8. Understanding Governance: Ten Years On - R.A.W. Rhodes 01/08/2007

        Article  Overview: This paper gives an overview of current research. Considerations: Consider what possible research on governance may be required in the next ten years, organise your thoughts by reflecting on potential issues concerning organisations you know well.

  2. Unit 2 - Fundamental Responsibilities 24 items
    1. Resource 1 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 10 items
      1. Management and organisational behaviour - Laurie J. Mullins, Gill Christy 2016

        Book Essential Overview: Please read chapter 3 of Mullins entitled ‘The Organisational Environment’. The preceding Modules have all touched upon the importance of organisations for the theory and practice of security and risk management, and Module 4 will continue to develop this theme. An examination of corporate responsibilities, governance and social responsibility will necessarily focus on the organisation as a system, rather than on its individual members. Considerations: As you read begin to consider the factors which influence why and how organisations interact with their members as well as the wider environment. You should also consider how a systemic view of organisations might contribute to an understanding of their fundamental responsibilities.

      2. Business continuity management: a crisis management approach - Dominic Elliott, Ethné Swartz, Brahim Herbane 2010

        Book Essential Overview: Please read the short section on Product Liability (pages 57-65). Considerations: As you read please consider question 1 of the Study Questions posed on page 65-66.

      3. A Summary of the GM Recall of Chevrolet Cobalts and Other Cars | New Republic

        Webpage Essential Overview: This article presents an overview of the recall of GM cars and the wider issue of regulation. Considerations: Having read this and the following two resources revisit study question 1 in Elliott et al (2010) and consider whether you would answer it any differently now.

      4. GM: Steps to a recall nightmare - CNNMoney

        Webpage Essential Overview: The article presents a timeline of events in relation to the recall of GM cars. Considerations: Once you have read this and the following resource o resources revisit study question 1 in Elliott et al (2010) and consider whether you would answer it any differently now.

      5. GM Ignition Update - United States - Home

        Webpage Essential Overview: This and the previous two resources provide further details of the GM recall, including GM’s own safety information. Considerations: Having read all three resources revisit study question 1 in Elliott et al (2010) and consider whether you would answer it any differently now.

      6. Better Ignition Switch Would Have Cost GM 90 Cents 2/4/2014

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview: As you view this short video (2:42) on the General Motors (GM) ignition switch recall and reflecting on the above articles, you should consider the role that organisational culture played in the delayed recall and the subsequent crisis. Considerations: Do you agree with the presenter’s analysis which suggests the risk assessment process put people’s lives ahead of a 90 cent fix?

      7. A mammoth guilt trip; Criminalising the American company

        Article  Overview: This article presents a brief, and more general, examination of corporate criminal liability in the United States. Considerations: Do you agree with the article’s assertion that in cases where investors and consumers are affected by a company’s actions, there is little reason to impose a fine through a criminal process, as the market will inflict its own punishment in the form of falling investments and sales? What, if any, are the problems with such an approach?

      8. The Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007: Thirteen Years in the Making but Was It Worth the Wait? - James Gobert 2008

        Article Essential Overview: Read Gobert’s review and analysis of the 2007 Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act. Considerations: Take some time to consider Goberts conclusion that the Act’s strength may lie more in its symbolic significance than its contents; is this a fair assessment of the Act?

      9. Corporate criminal liability: emergence, convergence, and risk - Mark Pieth, Radha Ivory c2011

        Book Essential Overview: Please read chapter 1 ‘Emergence and Convergence: Corporate Criminal Liability Principles in Overview’ which provides a comprehensive review of the material outlined in this Resource.

      10. CORPORATE CULTURE' AS A BASIS FOR THE CRIMINAL LIABILITY OF CORPORATIONS - Allens Arthur Robinson

        Document  Overview: You may also wish to read the 2008 Allens Arthur Robinson report on corporate criminal liability, as it provides a comparative review of numerous national approaches to the issue. The report also discusses a relatively new approach to corporate criminal liability which allows corporate culture to be considered as a contributing factor. Considerations: As you think back to the GM ignition recall crisis, do you think this new approach has merit?

    2. Resource 2 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 5 items
      1. Management and organisational behaviour - Laurie J. Mullins, Gill Christy 2016

        Book Essential Overview: Reread chapter three with a specific focus on the role of stress in the workplace (Beginning on page 92) Considerations: Take some time to consider the critical review and reflection questions on pages 100 - 105.

      2. Fundamentals of risk management: understanding, evaluating and implementing effective risk management - Paul Hopkin 2012

        Book Essential Overview: Please read chapter 16 ‘Loss Control’, pages 170-176, chapter 21 ‘Tolerate, Treat, Transfer and Terminate’, pages 224-234 and chapter 22 ‘Risk Control Techniques’, pages 235-243 and 249-250. Considerations: These chapters examine hazard risks, health and safety, and associated risk management techniques. After you have read the chapters, think of an organisation with which you are familiar and compile a list of hazard risks that it faces. Apply the 4Ts of hazard risk management to each and decide whether the best approach would be to treat, tolerate, transfer or terminate.

      3. Improving safety and health at work through a Decent Work Agenda (short version) 21/11/2012

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview: Watch this short video (5:45) which introduces the work of the ILO in five countries around the world, examining the projects that have been implemented to improve workplace health and safety and help businesses stay productive and competitive.

      4. EN - European Agency for Safety and Health at Work: What we do 17/9/2014

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview: This short video from EU-OSHA looks at the costs of workplace accidents and welfare issues to individuals, businesses and EU member states. The video also introduces EU-OSHA’s mission and 2014-2020 strategic programme and its efforts to support the effective management of health and safety risks.

      5. The Promise and limits of private power: promoting labor standards in a global economy - Richard M. Locke 2013

        Book  Overview: Please read chapter 1 ‘The Rise of Private Voluntary Regulation in a Global Economy’ (pages 1-23) examines how global supply chains challenge existing health and safety governance mechanisms. Considerations: Spend some time reflecting on the author’s assertion that health and safety cannot be left to the private sector and that national governments and international organisations must continue to play a critical role. Do you agree and if not, why not?

    3. Resource 3 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 9 items
      1. Human Security Presentation - United Nations 2011

        Document Background Overview: This reading provides an introduction to the idea of human security as proposed by the United Nations.

      2. Human Security Unit Strategic Plan 2014-2017 - United Nations

        Document  Overview: This reading provides an introduction to the idea of human security as proposed by the United Nations.

      3. Human Security - A New Response to Complex Threats - United Nations 8/5/2013

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview: This short video provides an introduction to the concept of Human Security proposed by the United Nations.

      4. Human Security: Paradigm Shift or Hot Air? - Roland Paris 2001

        Article Essential Overview: Paris’ article examines a number of practical and academic challenges presented by the concept, arguing that while its broad definition may enable collective action, it may also constrain its utility as a tool of analysis. Considerations: Reflecting on the UN documents and video and Paris’ article, think about how you would you define ‘Human Security’ and consider what, if any, relevance it has for your own experience of risk and security management.

      5. A Brief History of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) 9/5/2013

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview: This short video examines the origins of the R2P principle and outlines its core components.

      6. The End of the Responsibility to Protect? | Foreign Policy Journal - C Keeler

        Webpage Essential Read either this short artcle or the next and spend some time considering whether R2P can provide a realistic and widely accepted mechanism to address crimes against humanity. Considerations: Can you think of a contemporary situation in which R2P might be applied? What factors might prevent support for collective action under the R2P rubric?

      7. Is it possible to meet the Responsibility to Protect? - R Paris

        Webpage Essential Overview: Read this article or the previous one and spend some time considering whether R2P can provide a realistic and widely accepted mechanism to address crimes against humanity. Considerations: Can you think of a contemporary situation in which R2P might be applied? What factors might prevent support for collective action under the R2P rubric?

      8. Corporate Security Responsibility: Towards a Conceptual Framework for a Comparative Research Agenda - K. D. Wolf, N. Deitelhoff, S. Engert 01/09/2007

        Article Essential Overview: This resource and the two that follow provide a comprehensive analysis of business involvement in R2P, and provide a number of case studies for you to examine the role of the private sector in public security provision. Considerations: As you read these resources, take some time to think about how such activities will impact an organisation’s security and risk management programmes. What challenges and opportunities do they present? What are the incentives for, and barriers to, greater private sector involvement in human security and conflict prevention? To what degree has the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda pushed forward this debate?

      9. Business Participation in the Responsibility to Protect - D. C. Seyle 2013

        Article  Overview: This resource provides a comprehensive analysis of business involvement in R2P, and provide a number of case studies for you to examine the role of the private sector in public security provision. Considerations: As you read these resources, take some time to think about how such activities will impact an organisation’s security and risk management programmes. What challenges and opportunities do they present? What are the incentives for, and barriers to, greater private sector involvement in human security and conflict prevention? To what degree has the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda pushed forward this debate?

  3. Unit 3 - Data Protection and Information Security 19 items
    1. Resource 1 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 7 items
      1. Data Protection Act 1998

        Journal Essential Overview: This provides the key insight into the law and principles of data protection. Considerations: As you read the text, note down the Eight Principles and consider the extent to which they represent a good response to the problems they seek to tackle. Should there be others? You can access the online document in the Next Part and as such will require a wifi connection to do so.

      2. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) – Final text neatly arranged

        Website Essential Overview Legislation pertaining to data protection changed in 2018. Consideration: Although it is too early to tell what impact this legislation may have, to what extent does it represent a shift from the Data Protection Act?

      3. Serious Crime Act 2015

        Journal Essential Overview: This legislation enables a much wider application of its rulings to be made to cover cyber attacks which ‘affect human life and the disruption of communications and facilities with longer prison sentences and uncapped fines’ (Serious Crime Act, 2015, p. 35) for the perpetrators. It deals with ‘more serious’ crimes and perhaps most importantly of all signals the extent to which cyber crime has emerged as a threat at both the organisational and national security levels. Considerations: Identify the key words in this new legislation which give the courts further powers. Do you think this will deter a cyber criminal?

      4. Can legislation stop cyber crime? - S James

        Webpage Essential Overview and Considerations: This article provides one view on this area but do you agree?

      5. Cyber war: the next threat to national security and what to do about it - Richard A. Clarke, Robert K. Knake 2012

        Book Essential Overview Please read pages 226 – 255 in which Clarke advocates expanding the Geneva Convention to include cyber weapons (p. 242). In this leading work on Cyber War, the author explains how vulnerable the US in particular is to cyber weapons. In these pages he outlines the issues in some detail and urges his reader to support various strategies to prevent such a cyber war from taking place. Considerations: What are the key issues to be considered at a meeting of Nations to determine a worldwide approach to cyber crime.

      6. Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity. Version 1.0.

        Document Essential Overview: In the light of President Obama’s directive and the importance placed by PwC on this Framework it clearly has a significant role in US Cyber Security Strategy. ISACA (http://www.isaca.org/) [Accessed on 04/06/2015] the leading Information Security association with more than 115,000 constituents in 180 countries was also very involved in the development of this document. Since many senior Information Security professionals are members of this organisation and it recommends its implementation the importance it has for developing cyber resilience cannot be underestimated. Considerations: Identify the key principles of the Cyber Security Framework (CSF) which you could implement in your own organisation to strengthen its cyber security strategy.

      7. The Handbook of Security - M. L. Gill 2006

        Book Essential Overview Please read Chapter 15 by Lennon, Y. and Grabosky entitled ‘Cybercrime and Establishing a Secure Cyberworld’. This chapter provides a good background to some of the problems posed by cybercrime and some of the differences between crime and security in the cyberworld compared to the physical world. Considerations: From what you have learnt so far consider what constitute the main forms of cyber crime and the impact this has made on National Security Strategies.

    2. Resource 2 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 6 items
      1. State sponsored cyber-attacks happen more and more often - Kaspersky 24/1/2015

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview: This short clip (2:48) summarises the new interest in cyber crime at Board level. It states that a few years ago CEOs would not want to talk to Anti Virus experts but now at the World Economic Forum in Davos they are sought after. The video claims that leading politicians and Board members are concerned about cyber crime. It mentions recent cyber attacks and interviews a leading Security professional, Eugene Kaspersky, CEO, Kasperky lab, on his understanding of the latest threats to businesses and the CNI. Considerations: In the light of this report consider why senior executives in leading companies and Government leaders should be concerned.

      2. ISO/IEC 27002:2013 - Information technology -- Security techniques -- Code of practice for information security controls

        Webpage Essential Overview: This International Standard has influenced the development of Information Security across the globe. It plays a significant role in the NIST Cyber Security Framework and has been revised in October 2013 to include new areas of security management such as mobile phone security. Considerations: Critically evaluate the Standard as you read it. As a head of Information Security, how you would use this Standard to work with other areas of the organisation.

      3. NIST Special Publication 800-83 Guide to Malware Incident Prevention and Handling for Desktops and Laptops. - M Souppaya, K Scarfone

        Document Essential Overview This document provides an excellent practical guide for processes and procedures to identify and reduce the risks of malware to an organisation. Since this is such an important threat and this document has been specifically developed by the US Govt in response then it makes great sense to understand its principles. Considerations Consider what an organisation can do to prevent and detect malware on its systems?

      4. 2015 Information security breaches survey - PwC UK

        Webpage Essential Overview: This is the latest of the series of Information Security Breaches Surveys, carried out since the early 1990s. PwC carried out the survey, analysed the results and produced the report; InfoSecurity Europe assisted with marketing the survey. In total there were 664 respondents from IT professionals, business managers and executives and non executive directors. Considerations: What are the key threats highlighted? Is it acceptable to focus on technology or are there other risks? Usually it is a balance of the two, the insider and the external attack. Does the evidence from the respondents support this view? Are organisations using the ISO 27001:2013 Standard and the controls to help them? Does its limited use (25 – 47%) help to explain the rise in attacks or is it just that adopters maybe better positioned to defend and respond than the rest?

      5. Lost on the Silk Road: Online drug distribution and the 'cryptomarket' - J. Martin 01/07/2014

        Article  Overview: This article looks at how on-line communication technologies are transforming crime. It looks at offenders use of a website that employs advanced encryption to facilitate crime. Considerations: As you read think through the main barriers to relying on and using encryption in business activities.

      6. Anatomy of the Online Dating Romance Scam - M Whitty

        Webpage  Overview: The Online Romance Scam emerged in about 2008. Criminals pretend to initiate a relationship through online dating sites then defraud their victims of large sums of money. This paper discusses how the offence works. Considerations: As you read think about potential security solutions.

    3. Resource 3 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 6 items
      1. North Korea behind Sony Pictures hack? - CNN Video

        Webpage Essential Overview: There are many issues highlighted in this newscast. Considerations: What was the impact on the business, the staff and customers? What were the causes? We know that President Obama stated the North Koreans were behind the attack and that a proportionate response would be made. He gave a speech which indicates the importance of collaboration in cyber security strategies of the future (The White House, 2015). Will future cyber attacks lead to higher investment in cyber defence? What does a proportionate response look like?

      2. The cyber hell - Eugene Kaspersky on the 3rd annual International Cyber Security Conference 12/7/2013

        Audio-visual document  Overview: Eugene Kaspersky outlines his 7 areas of a Cyber Inferno. Considerations: What are the main issues of a Cyber Inferno? What can be done? What is he most worried about and why?

      3. A Year is a Short Time in Cyber-Space, in Cyber Security 2.0: Reflections on UK/EU Cyber Security co-operation.

        Document Essential Please scroll down the page until you come to the article - you will then be able to directly download it. Overview: The Industry and Parliament Trust is a charitable body which brings together Industry and parliament with a view to promoting best practise in the public and private sectors. James Willison, Vice Chair of the Convergence committee was invited to write an article on behalf of ASIS Europe to draw attention to the problems of blended cyber physical threats to CNI and to urge organisations to establish multi-disciplinary teams to examine the threats and identify attacks. He discusses the important principles of the ANSI ASIS PAP Standard in this paper and how convergence will lead to a faster response and recovery from a cyber physical attack than a siloed approach. Considerations: Consider the main cyber physical threats to a business and how would you establish a cross functional team to identify them?

      4. EuroDynamics - C Teuber 2012

        Webpage  Scroll 3/4 down the page to see the article "Security Convergence - Can we afford to ignore it" Overview: Supporting the converged approach Teuber (2012), a senior Swiss security professional and long standing member of the committee, writes in ASIS EuroDynamics: “Security convergence is an integrated view of security, irrespective of whether it touches physical or logical security ... Continuing in our traditional security world, separated into physical and IT security, we may ignore risks in the interface of the two and could even be blind to recognise new risks”. Considerations: What other aspects of his article do you find interesting and helpful?

      5. Physical and IT Security - Joseph Kinslow 2006

        Article  Overview In this work the author discusses the issue of converging what have traditionally been two silo departments when it comes to data protection, IT security and physical security. Consideration: Think about your organisation approach to data handling and security - does that reflect the things Kinslow notes in his article?

      6. Corporate Security: Managing the Risk Across the Security Continuum - Shayne Bates

        Webpage  Overview: Shayne Bates has supported the committee’s work, as a leader of the ASIS IT security council. He has worked with Brian Allen at TimeWarnerCable and writes here of the Enterprise Security Risk Management strategy in place at their Enterprise Risk Operations Centre. It is a fine example of an ESRM approach which some companies are following so that they have a more holistic view of the variety of risks they face and can prioritise these more efficiently.

  4. Unit 4 - Corporate Social Responsibility 22 items
    1. Resource 1 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 6 items
      1. Corporate Social Responsibility as Risk Management: A Model for Multinationals - B Kytle, J Ruggie

        Document  Overview: Kytle and Ruggie’s paper addresses managing the social risks that have accompanied the rise of the CSR agenda. Considerations: What are the main differences between traditional risks (economic, technological and political) and social risks? Do you agree with Kyle and Ruggie’s assertion that that these new risks cannot be mitigated by traditional means and require new approaches to risk management?

      2. Management and organisational behaviour - Laurie J. Mullins, Gill Christy 2016

        Book Essential Overview: Please read chapter 14 entitled ‘Corporate Responsibility and Ethics’ in which Mullins examines CSR from an organisational perspective, looking at how organisational ideologies, values and beliefs feed attitudes towards CSR. The chapter moves on to examine the importance of stakeholders and how organisations must balance their pursuit of profit and efficiency (see Unit 4, Module 1) with responsibilities to a wide variety of stakeholders. Considerations: Once you have read the chapter, complete the critical review and reflection exercises.

      3. Building a New Institutional Infrastructure for Corporate Responsibility - Sandra Waddock 2008

        Article Essential Overview: Waddock’s article provides a concise history of the development of CSR before moving on to examine the wide variety of mechanisms that have been developed to further the CSR agenda. Considerations: Do you agree with Waddock’s conclusion that the proliferation of CSR standards has led to confusion? Consider the different roles of governments, civil society and business/trade organisations; where do you think responsibility for the development and monitoring of standards should lie?

      4. Corporate Social Responsibility Theories: Mapping the Territory - Elisabet Garriga and Domènec Melé 2004

        Article Essential Overview: Garriga and Mele review the main theories of, and approaches to, CSR, classifying them into four groups. Considerations: Which of the four main approaches - integrative, instrumental, political or ethical - do you find most compelling and why? Do you agree with the authors’ conclusion that a new theory of CSR should be developed to encompass the four dimensions of profit, political performance, social demands, and ethical values (Garriga and Mele, 20014, p.51)?

      5. It's Hard to Be Good.

        Article  Overview: You may also wish to read this Harvard Business Review article which profiles five companies that the authors use to illustrate how CSR can be compatible with a strong bottom line. Considerations: Do these short case studies challenge or reinforce your answer to the critical review and reflection exercise you completed in chapter 17 of Mullins (2013)?

      6. The phantom capitalists: the organization and control of long-firm fraud - Michael Levi 2008

        Book Essential Overview Please read chapter 3 entitled ‘Craft of the Long-Firm Fraudster ‘. Levi’s book focuses on a particular kind of corporate fraud in which the company principals set out with a long-term plan to systematically siphon off large amounts of money, to the extent that eventually the company hits an irrecoverable cash-flow crisis and goes bankrupt as they intended. Case examples of this kind of fraud are provided in Unit 4 Resource 2.

    2. Resource 2 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 4 items
      1. Private Security Contractors - Council on Foreign Relations

        Webpage Essential Overview: Read this online discussion hosted by the Council on Foreign Relations which sees the issue of PSCs and PMCs debated by the President of the International Peace Operations Association (representing PSCs) and a legal fellow from the human rights organisation Amnesty International. Considerations: Who offers the most compelling argument and why?

      2. The International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers - Geneva Academy

        Document  Overview: Read this briefing paper which provides a detailed examination of the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Providers. Considerations: Think about how can the Code could put into practice in a security organisation and identify some of the main steps that security companies could take. What are some of the main challenges they may face?

      3. The Handbook of Security - M. L. Gill 2014

        Book Essential Overview: Read the chapter by Carmola entitled ‘Private Military and Security Companies: Armed, Global, Regulated, Professional?’ Considerations: Carmola suggests the rise of PMSCs can be seen from one of two perspectives: the first claims that PMSCs have filled a void left by the retreat of the state, a consequences of the contraction of state military and security forces, the second that PMSCs can only operate with the legitimising support and regulation that states provide. In your opinion which perspective provides the best explanation for the growth of PMSCs?

      4. Netherlands International Law Review 04/2015

        Journal  Overview In addition to the article by Carmola you may wish to read MacLeod’s 2015 article which addresses the self-regulation of PSC. Considerations MacLeod asserts that by allowing PSCs to self-regulate, states are effectively relieving themselves of responsibility and evading their own obligations. Do you agree? What does this mean for the future regulation of PSCs?

    3. Resource 3 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 12 items
      1. Ford Motors, CSR and Brand Reputation Management - 3BL Media Special Edition 7/12/2010

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview: This short video (2:17) examines the fortunes of two automotive companies (Ford and Toyota) with regards to reputation risks and their bottom line. The analyst suggests that reputation risk management is more than good PR and is integral to a comprehensive CSR programme. Considerations: How do the fortunes of Ford and Toyota support this claim?

      2. Reputation Institute | Reputation Measurement & Stakeholder Management

        Website Essential Overview: Spend some time exploring the Reputation Institute’s website. The Reputation Institute is a research and advisory company specialising in reputation. Among their products is an annual CSR report that rank the top 100 global companies in terms of CSR reputation. This report is based on performance in the citizenship, governance and workplace dimensions of reputation. Considerations: Examine the top 100; are there any companies that you are surprised to see included in (or excluded from) the list?

      3. Fundamentals of risk management: understanding, evaluating and implementing effective risk management - Paul Hopkin 2012

        Book Essential Overview: Read chapter 35 (pages 370 – 378) which examines the relationship between CSR and reputation and the significant overlap between the risk management and CSR agendas. Considerations: Do you agree with Hopkins’ assertion that reporting on CSR can help controversial organisations or industries operating in areas with little public support?

      4. Defining and managing reputation risk A framework for risk managers - Airmic

        Document Essential Overview: The airmic 2015 report on reputation risk has been written specifically for those in the risk management field, providing a framework for the definition and management of reputation risk. The report establishes the importance of reputation risk but recognises it is an underdeveloped field in risk management. There are number of short case studies at the end of the report which illustrate the risks that reputational issues present, and the consequences of a successful – or otherwise – reputation risk management programme. Considerations: Study the reputation risk management framework in Appendix 1 (p.28); can you think of a real life example of a reputation risk event for each of the seven categories?

      5. Five Years After Deepwater Horizon, Can BP Repair Its Reputation? | Sustainable Brands - L Kaye

        Webpage Essential Overview: This short article and the next discuss the impact of Deepwater Horizon on BP’s reputation, within the context of its CSR activities. Considerations: After you have read the articles spend some time thinking about whether BP’s CSR programme intensified the short and long-term crisis implications of Deepwater and how BP’s CSR activities, before and after Deepwater, affected the company’s reputation overall.

      6. A Tale Of Two CEOs, BP vs. Massey: Part I, BP - Forbes - J Epstein-Reevers

        Webpage Essential Overview: This short article and the next discuss the impact of Deepwater Horizon on BP’s reputation, within the context of its CSR activities. Considerations: After you have read the articles spend some time thinking about whether BP’s CSR programme intensified the short and long-term crisis implications of Deepwater and how BP’s CSR activities, before and after Deepwater, affected the company’s reputation overall.

      7. Beyond Profit: Rethinking Corporate Social Responsibility and Greenwashing after the BP Oil Disaster - Cherry, M.; Sneirson, J. 2011

        Article Essential Overview: This journal article and the next provide a comprehensive analysis of the perception-reality gap that existed between BP’s public commitment to CSR and its operational realities. Cherry and Sneirson use the case study as an opportunity to suggest reforms in the governance of CSR to ensure fraudulent claims of CSR are both recognised and penalised. Considerations: What can the BP case study contribute to the wider debate about ‘greenwashing’? Do you agree that the threat of penalties will encourage organisations to close any CSR perception-reality gap?

      8. Beyond Legitimacy: A Case Study in BP’s “Green Lashing” - Sabine Matejek, Tobias Gössling 2014-4

        Article Essential Overview: Matejek and Gössling examine the issue of legitimacy and how BP has used its CSR programme to build and attempt to repair its legitimacy before and after Deepwater. They conclude that BP lost moral legitimacy following Deepwater and this has had significant financial implications for the organisatione of CSR to ensure fraudulent claims of CSR are both recognised and penalised. Considerations: What can the BP case study contribute to the wider debate about ‘greenwashing’? Do you agree that the threat of penalties will encourage organisations to close any CSR perception-reality gap? . What are some of the wider CSR lessons that Deepwater Horizon presents for all organisations?

      9. Sustainability | BP Global

        Webpage Essential Overview: Spend some time exploring BP’s CSR and Gulf of Mexico Restoration web pages. The former is a very public expression of BP’s commitment to being ‘a world-class operator, a responsible corporate citizen and a good employer’. Considerations: To what extent is this undermined by the information provided in the Gulf of Mexico pages? In your opinion has BP been successful in its attempts to repair its reputation?

      10. Gulf environmental restoration | Gulf commitment | BP U.S.

        Webpage Essential Overview: Spend some time exploring BP’s CSR and Gulf of Mexico Restoration web pages. The former is a very public expression of BP’s commitment to being ‘a world-class operator, a responsible corporate citizen and a good employer’. Considerations: To what extent is this undermined by the information provided in the Gulf of Mexico pages? In your opinion has BP been successful in its attempts to repair its reputation?

      11. Experiences from a Real Convergence Project

        Webpage  Oparnica, representing Croatia on the committee advises companies on converged projects. He outlines the processes of implementing a real converged project, the difficulties that arise and the benefits to the business. What are the problems and benefits he outlines?

  5. Unit 5 - Regulating Private Security 16 items
    1. Resource 1 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 5 items
      1. Doing security: Critical reflections and an agenda for change - Mark Button 2008

        Book Essential Overview Please read chapter 2 ‘Security Failure and the Security Myth’. In this chapter Button maps out some of the most common problems found on the selling side of the market for security, such as robbery, theft, fraud, violence. Considerations As you read note how these problems are explored through a series of high profile case studies including the Gardner Museum Heist in Boston, September 11th and Prince William’s 21st Birthday Party.

      2. The moral economy of security - I. Loader, B. Goold, A. Thumala 01/11/2014

        Article Essential Loader, Goold and Thumala explore some of the economic and moral problems arising from the buying and selling of private security services. As you read note in particular the ways issues of distributional inequality (where the rich benefit from the market for security more than the poor) and of social solidarity and trust (where the more individuals seek to realise their own security interests through the market, the greater the erosion of the social bonds which knit society together).

      3. The paradox of security regulation: public protection versus normative legitimation - Martin J. Smith, Adam White 01/07/2014

        Article Essential Smith and White argue that the common calls for regulating the selling side of the market in the public interest need to be considered alongside the private security industry’s desire for regulating the market in the economic interest. As you read note how big private security companies actively seek regulation in order to both push smaller companies out of the market (a process known as regulatory capture) and to enhance the legitimacy of their operations in the eyes of sceptical consumers.

      4. Corporate security in the 21st century: theory and practice in international perspective 2014

        Book Essential Overview In this chapter, White examines different reasons for the regulatory focus on contract rather than in-house private security, emphasising the importance of ‘visibility’ of each side of the industry in the public eye. Considerations As you read the chapter reflect on the question: to what extent do you think this focus is guided by public interest rationales and to what extent do you think it this focus is guided by economic interest rationales?

      5. Olympics Security, Seventh Report of Session 2012–13

        Document Essential The report provides a chronological analysis of G4S’s Olympics security contract, beginning with initial problems, then moving onto how they were dealt with, before looking at redress for G4S’s failures and lessons learnt. Considerations: Imagine yourself in the position of presenting evidence and arguments to the Home Affairs Committee i) for the contract as a form of regulation, ii) against the contract as a form of regulation. What evidence and arguments would you draw upon on each case?

    2. Resource 2 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 5 items
      1. Policing and security in practice: Challenges and achievements - Tim Prenzler 2012

        Book Essential Since the mid-1990s, Button (often with co-author Bruce George MP) has been refining a comprehensive model for regulating the selling side of the market for security. As you read consider the model’s main claims are that: a broad definition of the selling side of the market should be used, encompassing most sectors of the private security industry; regulation should remove criminality and raise standards in these sectors; and this function should be performed independent of the industry, ideally through a specifically designed statutory (or public) body. This chapter maps out the most up-to-date permutation of this influential model.

      2. The Handbook of Security - M. L. Gill 2006

        Book Essential Overview Please read chapter 38 by Prenzler and Sarre entitled ‘Regulation’ (pp.857-878.) Like Button (and George), Prenzler and Sarre have spent the past two decades gradually refining an influential model for regulating the selling side of the market for security. Considerations As you read this chapter, reflect on how they first provide a valuable review of relevant regulatory theory and practice, before arriving at their ‘Smart’ model of regulation, which is in many respects complementary to Button’s model.

      3. State Regulation concerning Civilian Private Security Services and their Contribution to Crime Prevention and Community Safety

        Document Essential This UN Report – prepared by Button – surveys the range of regulatory standards and principles which have been and could be used by states in order to control private security in the public interest. It is an important example of ‘optimal’ and ‘smart’ models of private security regulation are being translated into concrete and influential policy recommendations. This, and the previous texts, represent two high profile attempts at developing models of good practice. Having read these articles reflect on the following: compare and contrast the ‘optimal’ and ‘smart’ models of private security regulation, are they seeking to achieve the same objectives?

      4. Governing security for common goods - Clifford Shearing, Jennifer Wood 2003-9

        Article Essential Since the early 1980s, Shearing has been the most prominent analyst of the private security industry in the world. Since the mid-1990s, he (and a variety of co-authors including Bayley, Johnston and Wood) have been concerned with regulating the buying side of the market for security to ensure that disempowered consumers are able to gain access to private security services (thereby addressing issues of distributional inequality where the rich have greater access to the market than the poor). This article provides the best articulations of this regulatory model. This text and the one that follows represent different examples of experimental thinking. As you read this article and the next consider how realistic are these experimental models and what function do they play in the debate about how to regulate private security?

      5. How can we better align private security with the public interest? Towards a civilizing model of regulation - Ian Loader, Adam White 2015

        Article Essential Loader and White argue that in addition to regulating selling of security so as to ‘cleanse’ the market of ‘cowboy’ operators and regulating the buying of security so as to ‘communalise’ the market for disempowered consumers, it is also necessary to regulate the market so as to remedy the erosion of trust and social solidarity which common occurs through the selling and buying of security – that is, it is also necessary to ‘civilise’ the market. Specifically, Loader and White argue for the creation of a deliberative space in which buyers and sellers can discuss on equal terms the problems arising in the market place and how to reach democratic solutions to these problems. This and the preceding text represent different examples of experimental thinking. As you read this article consider how realistic are these experimental models and what function do they play in the debate about how to regulate private security?

    3. Resource 3 - Required and Recommended Reading/Viewing/Listening 6 items
      1. The impact of the Private Security Industry Act 2001 - Adam White 10/2015

        Article Essential Overview The Private Security Industry Act (PSIA) 2001 – the legislation which provided for the statutory regulation of the private security industry in the United Kingdom – has received a great deal of critical attention (in part because it has been the focal point of Button’s work over the past couple of decades). White evaluates the extent to which the PSIA 2001 has so far achieved its objectives of reducing criminality and raising standards on the selling side of the market. Considerations As you read consider how he argues that, hampered by shifting political agendas in the UK regulatory landscape as well as difficulties in making the market legible, the PSIA has to date only achieved these objectives to a rather limited degree.

      2. The occupations of regulators influence occupational regulation: evidence from the US private security industry - Brian Meehan, Bruce L. Benson 2015-1

        Article Essential Because the United Kingdom has a unitary system of government, the PSIA 2001 has brought about a relatively uniform regulatory regime across England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland (though there is small amount of regional variation). By contrast, because the United States has a federal system of government, private security regulation is administered at the state level. As you read consider how Meehan and Benson explore not only variations in institutional blueprints between states but also how the variable composition of regulatory boards gives rise to different political agendas which play out in the regulatory arena.

      3. Seeing private security like a state - D. O'Connor, R. Lippert, D. Spencer, L. Smylie 01/05/2008

        Article Essential Focusing on the regulation of contact private security in both Canada and the United States, the authors explore how different public bodies constitute problems in the industry in different ways so as to purposely create divergent governing agendas. This in turn, they argue, allows public bodies to govern through private security – that is, private security regulation becomes a means to further political ends rather than an end in itself. This text and the two that follow represent examples of such analyses discussed earlier. As you read reflect on the questions: what are the key political, social and economic factors responsible for distorting the regulation of contract private security providers?; and to what extent is it possible to control or mitigate these factors?

      4. Private Security Services in Europe

        Document  The Confederation of European Security Services have compiled an easy to read survey of private security legislation in 34 European countries. While the survey gives no sense of the competing agendas which run through these pieces of legislation, it does illustrate which mechanisms of statutory regulation are most common and how they are administered. As such, the report provides very useful background to the above readings.

      5. Regulation and criminal justice: innovations in policy and research - Hannah Quirk, Toby Seddon, Graham Smith 2010

        Book Essential Zwelethemba – a small settlement in the Western Cape, South Africa – is the most commonly cited example of regulating the buying side of the market so as to give disempowered consumers access to private security services (as well as other security and justice goods). In this chapter, Shearing and Froestad summarise the extensive academic research conducted on this community over the past couple of decades and bring out its theoretical and practical implications. pp.103-133.

      6. Post-crisis Policing and Public–Private Partnerships - Adam White 11/2014

        Article Essential In this article, White examines the lifecycle of the £229 million contract between Lincolnshire Police and G4S, beginning with an analysis of how the contract was negotiated, before moving onto an investigation into how the contract has subsequently been implemented. He finds that the abstract terms and conditions of the contract have generated a variety of intended and unintended consequences. As you read the article reflect on the question do contracts suffer from the same problems as more targeted forms of regulation or do they face a different set of difficulties?

  6. Unit 6 - Governance and its Consequences 25 items
    1. Resource 1 11 items
      1. Rogue trader - Nick Leeson, Edward Whitley 2015

        Book Essential Please read chapter 8

      2. Nick Leeson Keynote Speaker 14/12/2012

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview Watch this short (6:14) video about Nick Leeson. Considerations Consider who else besides this 'rogue trader' contributed to the collapse of Barings Bank.

      3. Return to an order of the Honourable the House of Commons dated 18 July 1995 for the Report of the Board of Banking Supervision inquiry into the circumstances of the collapse of Barings HC 673 - 0673.pdf

        Document Essential Overview Read Section 7 of the ‘Report of the Board of Banking Supervision inquiry into the circumstances of the collapse of Barings’. Considerations: Pay particular attention to the failures in internal control.

      4. Ethics, Governance and Risk Management: Lessons from Mirror Group Newspapers and Barings Bank - Lynn T. Drennan 2004

        Article  Overview: Read the article ‘Ethics, governance and risk management: Lessons from mirror group newspapers and Barings bank’. Considerations: Consider more recent financial scandals caused through poor risk management and governance and assess the extent to which you feel the lessons that need to be learned are reflected in current practices and approaches.

      5. Robert Francis: Insights into the Mid Staffordshire inquiry 14/3/2013

        Audio-visual document  Overview: Watch this BBC documentary which details the events of the Hillsborough disaster. Considerations: As you watch identify the different points at which security management could have intervened to reduce the escalation of events that unfolded.

      6. Hillsborough - The Search for Truth - SteCooper 11/9/2012

        Audio-visual document  Overview: This BBC documentary details the events of the Hillsborough disaster. Considerations: As you watch identify the different points at which security management could have intervened to reduce the escalation of events that unfolded.

      7. Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds - Football Licensing Authority

        Document Essential Overview: Read Section 3 of the Guide to Safety at Sports Grounds detailing management responsibility for security and safety. Considerations: As you read identify what you consider to be the priorities to be.

      8. The Hillsborough stadium disaster: 15 April 1989: inquiry by the Rt Hon Lord Justice Taylor: final report: presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State for the Home Department by command of Her Majesty January 1990 - S Taylor

        Document Essential Overview: Read Chapter 3 of the final Taylor Report detailing the provisions to be made to enhance safety and security at sports stadiums. Considerations: As you read consider if these had been implemented at the time of the Hillsborough disaster, what difference these would have made to the outcome.

      9. Hillsborough, The Report of the Hillsborough Independent Panel - Hillsborough Independent Panel

        Document Essential Overview: Read the Report Summary of the Hillsborough Independent Panel report. Considerations: Note in particular what new facts were publicly disclosed and how justice for the bereaved families and survivors was achieved. The families of the victims were seen to have been given justice.

    2. Resource 2 9 items
      1. The Southall rail accident inquiry report - J Uff

        Document Essential Read Chapters 16 and 17 of The Southall rail accident inquiry report to find out in detail the lessons learned from the crash and recommendations as a result.

      2. Risk, Trust, and Safety Culture in U.K. Train Operating Companies - Shelly Jeffcott, Nick Pidgeon, Andrew Weyman, John Walls 10/2006

        Article  Overview: Read the article by Jeffcott et al (2006) on train operating companies. Considerations: Note the effect privatisation of the railways in the UK since 1993, had on the issue of safety of the railways.

      3. The Southall rail accident inquiry report - J Uff

        Document Essential Overview: Read paragraphs 12.15; 12.16; 13.10; 13.18; 13.28; 14.27; 14.28; 15.22 and 15.23 of the Southall rail accident inquiry report to see what Uff identified as process failures in the rail industry overall. Considerations: Consider how these might have contributed to the Southall rail disaster.

      4. The Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007: Thirteen Years in the Making but Was It Worth the Wait? - James Gobert 2008

        Article Essential Overview: Read the article by Gobert (2008) about the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007 Considerations: Do you think this act has had the intended changes to governance and safety issues in organisations.

      5. Corporate manslaughter and regulatory reform - Paul Almond, ebrary, Inc c2013

        Book  Overview: Chapter 1 of Paul Almond’s book outlines in the ways in which corporations are being held legally responsible for causing deaths, and Chapter 2 focusses on developments from around the world. Considerations: As you read write down what you consider to be the main impediments to holding corporations to account for irresponsible behaviour leading to death.

      6. Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry: executive summary HC 947, Session 2012-2013 - 0947.pdf - R Francis

        Document Essential Overview: Read Sections 1.1 to 1.3 in the Executive Summary of the Francis Report, detailing the warning signs Considerations: Consider whether concerns could have been raised at an earlier date.

      7. Robert Francis: Insights into the Mid Staffordshire inquiry 14/3/2013

        Audio-visual document Essential Overview: Watch this short video featuring Dr Robert Francis giving his insights to the Mid Staffordshire inquiry. Considerations: What are the key lessons that emerge for preventing the seeds of disaster from occurring?

      8. Patients First and Foremost - Department of Health

        Document Essential

      9. Mid Staffordshire Hospital: Making the Right Changes - Cranfield School of Management 20/2/2013

        Audio-visual document Essential

    3. Resource 3 5 items
      1. Out-sourcing Security - A Gray

        Article  Overview This paper reviews some of the key considerations for outsourcing security. Note the specific focus on the quality of training provided for contracted staff. Considerations As you read consider what if anything has changed since this paper was written.

      2. Single Service or Bundle: Practitioner Perspectives on What Makes the Best ... 2015

        Article Essential Overview: This paper is based on original research and highlights perceptions of different models. Considerations: As you read through the paper consider the implications for how security is governed, what do you think the trend will be in a sector you are familiar with, going forward five years, and why?

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